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campanula

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BOTANICAL NAME
Campanula spp. (cam-PAN-yoo-la)

COMMON NAMES
Bellflower, Bluebell, Chimney bells, Canterbury bells, Star-of-Bethlehem, Falling stars

DESCRIPTION
The Campanula genus includes annual, biennial and perennial plants. The flowers are bell-, star- or funnel-shaped, are 1 inch to 2 inches wide and come in loose clusters at the ends of long stems. These plants perform well in hanging baskets and window boxes and as ground cover.

COLORS
Most Campanula varieties are available in violet-blue, purple, pink and white.

DECORATIVE LIFE
Campanulas can bloom for two to four weeks in the home. They can live for years in the garden, providing customers added value for their dollars.

AVAILABILITY
Campanulas are available year-round.

VARIETIES
There are more than 300 species of Campanula plants.

IN-STORE AND CONSUMER CARE
LIGHT
Indoors, display Campanulas in bright, indirect sunlight. Place outdoor plants in full sun to light shade.
WATER
Keep the soil moist to the touch at all times, but reduce watering during the winter rest period. Irregular watering and drying can cause bud drop. Avoid standing water.
TEMPERATURE
The optimal indoor temperature for displaying and storing Campanula plants is 60 F to 70 F. Do not refrigerate Campanulas because sudden drops in temperature can result in blossom drop, wilt or burn. During the winter, keep the plants cool, but don’t let the temperature go below 45 F.
HUMIDITY Moderate humidity is required, so mist Campanulas daily.
FERTILIZER
Healthy, fertilized plants are more tolerant of insect attacks. Be sure plants are well-watered before applying fertilizer, which should be applied at half rate sparingly during the spring and summer. Do not fertilize during the winter.
SOIL
Campanulas will do best in an acidic, moist, well-drained soil.
GROOMING To pro
long blooming, remove flowers once they have faded. Cut the plants back when they have finished flowering to remove straggly stems and faded blooms.

CHALLENGES
ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY
All Campanulas are moderately sensitive to ethylene gas, and some species are more sensitive than others. Check with your supplier to make sure your Campanula plants have been treated with an anti-ethylene agent at the grower level or during transportation.
PESTS Several insects are likely to show up on Campanulas. Check frequently for spider mites, aphids, thrips, scales, whiteflies and slugs.

 
 

fun facts



 
 


WHAT’S IN A NAME The genus name “Campanula” comes from the Latin word “campana” for “bell,” referring to the bell-shaped flowers.

FAMILY
Campanula is a member of the Campanulaceae, or bellflower, family. Relatives include Platycodon (balloon flower), Trachelium (throatwort) and Wahlenbergia.

HOME SWEET HOME
Campanulas are native to Europe.
 


 


Some information provided by:
Chain of Life Network®, www.chainoflifenetwork.org
The Houseplant Encyclopedia by Ingrid Jantra and Ursula Krüger
The New House Plant Expert, by Dr. D.G. Hessayon
Nurserymen’s Exchange, Inc., www.bloomrite.com
 

Super Floral Retailing • Copyright 2009
Florists' Review Enterprises, Inc.